All Thailand Experiences, The Holy Spirit in You.

The Spirit of truth

The Holy Spirit lives in you.

Hello again, I’m Randy Gaudet, founder and director of All Thailand Experiences. Those who have read my profile know how I first came to Thailand and my association with missions and churches since 1989.

We use funds from our tours to help the needy, change lives and spread the Good News of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. We teach about the Holy Trinity, Love and Grace because of Jesus Christ and to tell Christians they are free from the Law, sin and death.

At most churches in Thailand the old covenant law is being taught and that Grace is not available to you if you break the law. We are training pastors about the New Repentance as written in the Bible with help from Pastors Nathan and Salila Gonmei at Abundant Grace Church in Chiang Mai.

On all our All Thailand Experiences Christian teaching blogs I will point to scriptures and explain the meaning on the topic. As our mission is to reach Thai people we will then watch or listen to Pastors Nathan and Solila give a sermon on the topic in English and Thai Languages.

Today we’re going to talk about The Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit, in a sense, does from the inside what Christ would do from the outside: teach, convict, remind, and guide. In John 14:17, Jesus will clarify that this Helper is the Holy Spirit, who is available only to those who believe .

Many people misunderstand who the Holy Spirit is. Using Biblical scripture we will show you that the Holy Spirit is a person and will be with you for eternity if you have excepted Jesus Christ.

The Holy Spirit

Ephesians 1:13, NLT: “And now you Gentiles have also heard the truth, the Good News that God saves you. And when you believed in Christ, he identified you as his own by giving you the Holy Spirit, whom he promised long ago.”\

Sealed With The Holy Spirit

Notice how the sealing, occurring at only one time, is linked to one’s belief in Christ. Just as our saving belief happens only once, so the sealing, the guarantee of our faith, only happens once and remains with us for eternity

Paul describes three things that took place in the lives of the Ephesian believers. First, they heard the gospel, known as the word of truth (2 Timothy 2:15; James 1:18).

Second, rather than rejecting the message as many Jews had done, these Gentile believers both heard and believed the gospel and were saved as a result (Romans 10:9; Ephesians 2:8–9).

Third, Paul noted that when they became believers they “were sealed with the promised Holy Spirit.” This specific description of the Holy Spirit is only used in the book of Ephesians here, and in Ephesians 4:30, among a dozen total references to the Spirit in the letter. A “seal” was a mark indicating a letter or scroll was closed or completed. When a king or dignitary wanted to show an identifying mark with a letter, he would seal it with a resin imprint of his ring. The Holy Spirit likewise shows that believers belong to the Lord.

John 14:16, NLT: “And I will ask the Father, and he will give you another Advocate, who will never leave you.”

John-14-16

Jesus commanded the disciples to love each other (John 13:34–35) and to obey His commands (John 14:15). He has also reassured them that knowledge of Him is their means of salvation (John 14:6). In that context—acting in His name—Jesus also promised to provide whatever is asked of Him (John 14:14).

English translations of this verse are relatively consistent, but translating from Greek blurs a subtle difference in this statement. When Jesus refers to the disciples “asking” for something in prayer, He uses the root word ait󠅍eō (John 14:13–14; 15:7; 16:23). Here, however, Jesus uses the term erōtaō. This also means “to ask,” but carries a more personal and mutual sense. Jesus uses both words—with the same distinction between their requests and His—in John 16:26. This, once again, implies that Jesus shares a relationship with God which transcends mere humanity. It also reinforces the idea that prayer is not intended to blindly grant us our wishes.

“Helper,” here, is translated from the root term paraklētos. This can also be translated as a “comforter,” or “advocate.” This is the same term John will use later to describe Jesus in 1 John 2:1. That connection has meaning—Jesus will later point out that He is leaving behind His earthly ministry specifically, so the Holy Spirit can act (John 16:7). The Holy Spirit, in a sense, does from the inside what Christ would do from the outside: teach, convict, remind, and guide. In the following verse, Jesus will clarify that this Helper is the Holy Spirit, who is available only to those who believe (John 14:17).

This Spirit is guaranteed to be with the believer “forever.” This contrasts with the work of the Holy Spirit in the Old Testament, which came and went from God’s servants at various times (1 Samuel 19:23; 2 Chronicles 15:1; Judges 14:6).

The beautiful role of this “Helper” is also demonstrated by understanding its translation. In legal terms, the “defense attorney” is the paraklētos. The opposing side is the “accuser,” from the Greek katēgōr, a term John uses in Revelation 12:10. The concept of an “accuser” features heavily in the Old Testament, through the phrase ha sā’tān. The One who stands by us and guides us is God, the Holy Spirit—our accuser and enemy is Satan.

John 14:17, NIV: “the Spirit of truth. The world cannot accept Him, because it neither sees Him nor knows Him. But you know Him, for He lives with you and will be in you.”

IS THE HOLY SPIRIT A PERSON?

The Identity of the Holy Spirit 

To many people, the Holy Spirit is an enigma. Some see Him as an impersonal force or influence, some deny His very existence, and others are not certain who or what the Holy Spirit is. However, the Bible is very clear on this matter; the Holy Spirit is a person, the Third Person of the Holy Trinity.

The Definition of Person

By “person,” we mean one who has their own identity or individuality as a rational being. They are conscious of their own existence.

When we say that the Holy Spirit is a person some assume that He has eyes, feet, and hands. But these are not the marks of a person. The marks of a genuine person are knowledge, feeling, and will.

The fact that the Holy Spirit is a person can be observed in six ways.

The Holy Spirit is A Person
  1. He acts like a person.

2. He is treated as a person.

3. He has the ministry of a person.

4. He is mentioned in connection with other persons.

5. He is the Third Person of the Trinity, and therefore, is personal.

6. The Holy Spirit Has the Characteristics of a Person

We will now consider the personality of the Holy Spirit.

The Scriptures attribute to the Holy Spirit characteristics that only a person can truly possess. He is portrayed as a thinking being, a being who has a mind, an emotional being, and a volitional (or choosing) being.

The Holy Spirit Is a Thinking Being

The Bible says that the Holy Spirit has the intellectual capacity to think and know. These are the marks of personhood.

As we search the Scripture, the Holy Spirit is ascribed personality in the fullest sense. Indeed, through a study of Scripture a number of things become clear. The Holy Spirit has the attributes of a person. He has characteristics that only a genuine person can have.

The Spirit also performs the acts of a person. In other words, He does things that only a person can do. The Holy Spirit is treated as a person. In historical situations the Spirit of God is treated as other persons are treated. The Holy Spirit has the ministry of a person.

He does things that in the Christian ministry that only persons can do. The Holy Spirit is mentioned in connection with other persons. This is further indication that the Spirit of God is indeed a person.

The Holy Spirit is God, and therefore, by nature is personal. Each of these truths makes it clear that Spirit of God is indeed a person.


Galatians 5:25, KJV: “If we live in the Spirit, let us also walk in the Spirit.”

walk in the Spirit

Paul has been describing what it looks like to live as one who is free in Christ. He has been clear that this is not a freedom to do whatever feels good. It is not a freedom to simply indulge in trying to satisfy all our sinful desires. On the contrary, true salvation—and freedom from the Old Testament’s ritual law—is freedom from being controlled by our sinful desires. How? Just as we needed an external source, Jesus, to pay for our sin, we also need an external source of power, the Holy Spirit, to overcome our sinful desires and lead us in the right direction.

This happens, Paul has written, when we “walk by” (Galatians 5:16) and are “led by” (Galatians 5:18) the Spirit. The picture he paints is not one of possession in the sense that the Spirit takes us over and does whatever He wants. We are not spiritual robots, or puppets who suddenly lack free will. Instead the picture is one of Christians using our will to allow God’s Spirit to set the direction we will go.

It’s a mysterious idea than none of us fully understand, but the way Paul describes it in this verse is helpful. He says living by the Spirit involves keeping in step with the Spirit. It involves adjusting our pace to match the pace and direction the Spirit is leading. Sometimes, Bible teachers describe it as allowing one’s partner to lead in a dance. In other words, it involves submitting to God’s way, but we are still the one taking each next step.

This will not happen automatically. It is something we must choose from day to day. In fact, we must often choose to give the lead to the Spirit moment by moment .

Pastors Nathan and Salila Gonmei explain Biblically who the Holy Spirit is and how to walk with the Holy Spirit in the video below in English and Thai languages.

All Thailand Experiences Delivering Hope

Hope, Joy and Peace

Hello again, I’m Randy Gaudet, founder and director of All Thailand Experiences. Those who have read my profile know how I first came to Thailand and my association with missions and churches since 1989.

We use funds from our tours to help the needy, change lives and spread the Good News of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. We teach about the Holy Trinity, Love and Grace because of Jesus Christ and to tell Christians they are free from the Law, sin and death.

At most churches in Thailand the old covenant law is being taught and that Grace is not available to you if you break the law. We are training pastors about the New Repentance as written in the Bible with help from Pastors Nathan and Saia Gonmei at Abundant Grace Church in Chiang Mai.

On all our All Thailand Experiences Christian teaching blogs I will point to scriptures and explain the meaning on the topic. As our mission is to reach Thai people we will then watch or listen to Pastors Nathan and Solila give a sermon on the topic in English and Thai Languages.

Today we’re going to talk about Hope.

Romans 15:13, NIV: “May the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace as you trust in him, so that you may overflow with hope by the power of the Holy Spirit.”

Hope” is commonly used to mean a wish: its strength is the strength of the person’s desire. But in the Bible hope is the confident expectation of what God has promised and its strength is in His faithfulness.

Ordinarily, when we express hope, we are expressing uncertainty. But this is not the distinctive biblical meaning of hope. And the main thing I want to do this morning is show you from Scripture that biblical hope is not just a desire for something good in the future, but rather, biblical hope is a confident expectation and desire for something good in the future.

Biblical hope not only desires something good for the future — it expects it to happen. And it not only expects it to happen — it is confident that it will happen. There is a moral certainty that the good we expect, and desire will be done.

The Holy Spirit indwells us as believers. In addition to the many roles He plays in our lives, He seals us as belonging to God (see Ephesians 1:13-14). The Holy Spirit is the person of God who lives in us in our time on earth and teaches us to truly know and follow God.

Hope can be described as happy anticipation of good which is coming for the believer. This comes from knowing God because he is the author of hope so the more we walk with him the more this hope will overflow in our lives and others around us will take notice.

Paul writes to the Romans “May the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace as you trust in him”. Trust is something that is learned and experienced. The further we walk in fellowship with the Lord the more we know him and understand his will and desires concerning us. He fills us with joy and peace in His presence.

Joy is the source of happiness; it is more than a feeling. It is the ability to be content and joyful in every circumstance. Hebrews says that Jesus was anointed with the oil of joy (Hebrews 1:9, Psalm 45:7). Meaning; there has never been anyone more full of joy than Jesus. As his children it makes sense that we are also anointed and filled full of joy for this life. Peace is harmony in our relationships, but beyond that it can also be understood as a treaty or agreement to cease hostilities.

As God fills you with his peace, you will understand that you are at peace with Him. He is not angry at you for sin, he does not look at you as a filthy sinner, instead He sees you as he sees Jesus ( Ephesians 4:24, NIV: “and to put on the new self, created to be like God in true righteousness and holiness.”, Making this change is impossible without Christ and requires a Christian to be renewed in their thinking by God and the Holy Spirit. 1 John 4:17, NIV: “This is how love is made complete among us so that we will have confidence on the day of judgment: In this world we are like Jesus.”). These things are necessary for this life. The author of hope is able to fill you to overflowing with these things as you learn to trust him and experience Him by faith.

An amazing truth is that this all happens on a supernatural level by the power of the Holy Spirit living inside you as a believer. This hope that Paul is describing is supernatural, it is not based on feelings. This means how you feel cannot dictate whether or not you experience this hope. The hope is given by God and you have it. When we walk with the Lord, the anticipation of future things builds and builds until it overflows in your life.

Remember God is the author of hope and he has given you eternal life, which is knowing him in a personal and intimate way. We experience this life by faith and the more we practice it the more this joy, peace and hope will spill out into the natural realm of our lives.

Pastors Nathan and Salila Gonmei explain Biblical Hope and how to walk in it in the 16 minute video below in English and Thai languages.

All Thailand Experiences, Being Humble

James 4:10 Humble-Yourselves-Sight-Lord-He-Lift-You-Up
James 4:10 Humble-Yourselves-Sight-Lord-He-Lift-You-Up

Be Humble and receive God’s Power, He cares for you

Hello again, I’m Randy Gaudet, founder and director of All Thailand Experiences. Those who have read my profile know how I first came to Thailand and my association with missions and churches since 1989.

We use funds from our tours to help the needy, change lives and spread the Good News of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. We teach about the Holy Trinity, Love and Grace because of Jesus Christ and to tell Christians they are free from the Law, sin and death.

At most churches in Thailand the old covenant law is being taught and that Grace is not available to you if you break the law. We are training pastors about the New Repentance as written in the Bible with help from Pastors Nathan and Saia Gonmei at Abundant Grace Church in Chiang Mai.

On all our All Thailand Experiences Christian teaching blogs I will point to scriptures and explain the meaning on the topic. As our mission is to reach Thai people we will then watch or listen to Pastors Nathan and Solila give a sermon on the topic in English and Thai Languages.

Today we’re going to talk about being humble using scripture. To live an abundant life full of Grace the Bible teaches us a lot about Humility and how it affects our relationship with God.  There are many benefits of being humble for the born again believer.

Many people misunderstand what true humility really is. Using Biblical scripture we will show you what being humble is all about. Humility is not degrading or lowering your self-esteem but a necessary action to release God’s power in your life.

James 4:10, NIV: “Humble yourselves before the Lord, and he will lift you up.”

Everybody wants to be exalted. We all want to be glorified. Maybe we wouldn’t say so. Maybe we don’t feel it all of the time. But part of the motivation for living according to the world system is to get exaltation for ourselves. This comes in having the things we want, getting the respect we feel we deserve, or living in the comfort and pleasure we crave. God asks us to quit the world’s way of pursuing those things. Instead, He calls us to trust Him to exalt us when the time is right without trying to get that glory for ourselves.

1 Peter 5-6 Humble Yourself
1 Peter 5-6 Humble Yourself

1 Peter 5:6, NIV: “Humble yourselves, therefore, under God’s mighty hand, that he may lift you up in due time.”

All of us long to be glorified. We long to know that we are significant and to have others know it, as well. That desire is not necessarily wrong. All natural human desires have some legitimate, God-honoring purpose, and a means to express it properly. In this case, we are made in God’s image, and He has built into us the desire to be exalted. The key to a biblical, Christian view of glory is paying close attention to what God says about seeking it. The Bible teaches us to quit struggling so hard to make it happen, and trust God to exalt us at the right time and place as He sees fit. He’s a good Father who loves us; let Him be in charge of bringing us glory.

Jesus showed us how to do that. Philippians 2 reminds us that Jesus is God and yet, when He came to earth, He made Himself nothing. Instead, He became a servant to all. Then, at the right time, the Father elevated Jesus to the highest position in the universe. Peter echoes that idea in this and the following verse. Why are we so afraid to put on humility toward other Christians? Why does it bother us to live in submission to other people? We are afraid of becoming insignificant, of going unrecognized, of making ourselves nothing.

As used in Scripture, “humility” does not mean weakness or self-hatred. It means a proper appreciation of how we are, in relationship to God. It means strength under control.
Peter reminds us that we are not humbling ourselves under the hand of our human authorities, including the elders in the church. No, we are willingly humbling ourselves under the hand of God. When the proper time comes, He will exalt us either here, or in the life to come, or both, to some extent. Our willingness to serve, to make ourselves nothing, isn’t a declaration that we are, in fact, insignificant. Our humility in service is a declaration that our mighty God can be trusted to give us all the glory and recognition that we long for when time is right.

1 Peter 5:7, NIV: “Cast all your anxiety on him because he cares for you.”

1PETER5-7 God cares
1PETER5-7 God cares

This verse concludes the thought begun in verse 6. Christians must humble themselves under God’s mighty hand, trusting Him to exalt us at exactly the right time. We must quit the work of seeking our own glory in order to accept the work of serving and submitting to others. Then, when the time is right, our God will use His mighty hand to exalt us.

These are words of great encouragement, and maybe conviction, for those struggling to submit to harsh human authorities. It speaks to those serving year after year with little recognition. It encourages those providing for others of limited power or value in society. Natural human fear tells us we are wasting our lives, we are on the wrong path, that our choice to serve in humility without obvious reward is evidence that we may be worthless, after all.

Peter writes that we should take that fear and cast it—throw it—onto our Father God. In fact, he tells us to take all of our anxieties, everything that worries us, and to give it to the God who cares so deeply for us. This is not a promise that God will fix everything which worries us. God is not obligated to follow whatever script we write for Him. It’s a promise that the mighty God will receive our worries, and care about them. He will carry them for us. He is trustworthy to handle them in the way that is best.

Peter’s words are a command. It is not God’s will for His children to continue to live under those burdens. Believing that God is mighty and cares for us should result in our regularly handing over our worries to Him.

Pastors Nathan and Salila Gonmei explain Biblical humility and how to walk in it in the 16 minute video below. This is in English and Thai languages so share with your Thai friends.

All Thailand Experiences, Keeping A Healthy Soul.

Hello again, I’m Randy Gaudet, founder and director of All Thailand Experiences. Those who have read my profile know how I first came to Thailand and my association with missions and churches since 1989.

We use funds from our tours to help the needy, change lives and spread the Good News of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. We teach about the Holy Trinity, Love and Grace because of Jesus Christ and to tell Christians they are free from the Law, sin and death.

At most churches in Thailand the old covenant law is being taught and that Grace is not available to you if you break the law. We are training pastors about the New Repentance as written in the Bible with help from Pastors Nathan and Saia Gonmei at Abundant Grace Church in Chiang Mai.

On all our All Thailand Experiences Christian teaching blogs I will point to scriptures and explain the meaning on the topic. As our mission is to reach Thai people we will then watch or listen to Pastors Nathan and Solila give a sermon on the topic in English and Thai Languages.

Today we’re going to talk about a healthy soul or spiritual heart. Believe it or not you are a spirit, you have a soul and they live in your body. If you are a believer in Jesus Christ you are born again and you have a new spirit but your soul or spiritual heart has not changed. This is why many Christians keep sinning, doing stupid things, making bad decisions, depressed, angry, lonely and many wrong feelings.

So how do we attain a healthy soul or spiritual heart. God teaches us in His word.

Proverbs 4:23, NIV: “Above all else, guard your heart, for everything you do flows from it.”

Jesus announced: “The good person out of the good treasure of his heart produces good, and the evil person out of his evil treasure produces evil, for out of the abundance of the heart his mouth speaks” (Luke 6:45).

One positive result from maturity in a believer is not being tricked by false teaching. Those who are “no longer children” can stand against lies and deceit. Paul’s analogy of being “tossed to and fro by the waves” sounds like James 1:6, which instructs us to pray in faith without doubting. Jude 1:13 also uses the idea of “wild waves of the sea.” The goal is to avoid being “carried about by every wind of doctrine.” False teaching changes regularly. Those who are immature can easily be fooled into thinking false teaching is accurate.

Ephesians 4:14, NIV: “Then we will no longer be infants, tossed back and forth by the waves, and blown here and there by every wind of teaching and by the cunning and craftiness of people in their deceitful scheming.”

This can take place in two ways. First, believers can be deceived by “human cunning.” This is the power of human persuasion; a smooth talker can wield influence over others. Second, a person can be deceived by “craftiness in deceitful schemes.” These are evil plans that may appear good but actually promote something false. In Ephesians 6:11 Paul will add that believers can “Put on the whole armor of God, that [they] may be able to stand against the schemes of the devil.”

James 1:8, NIV: “Such a person is double-minded and unstable in all they do.”

This verse completes a crucial idea which James introduced in verse 5. God promises wisdom to all who ask Him for it. He promises to give it generously and not based on our merit. The caveat is that we must believe and not doubt. We must not seek wisdom from sources contrary to God at the same time, expecting to weigh God’s wisdom against others and decide which we will follow. We can consult godly advisors, and look to God’s creation, but we can’t weigh His wisdom against that of the world before we decide who to trust.

Verse 7 made it clear that a doubtful person—the one who treats God as only one of many options—should not expect to receive any wisdom from God. This verse calls that person both double-minded and unstable. Trying to live by God’s wisdom while also following a form of “wisdom” from another source will always lead us in two different directions. We will always be deciding whose wisdom feels more right to us in any given moment. In that way, we end up making a god of our own ability to pick the “right” wisdom from day to day.

James makes it clear that the only stable life is one in which a believer has resolved to follow God’s wisdom—period. Those who trust the Father seek wisdom from the Father and follow the wisdom the Father gives, no matter what.

Matthew 11:28, NIV: “Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest.”  29,”Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls.”

Jesus is not talking about physical rest, necessarily. The following verse will describe it as rest for the soul. The path to the Father through Jesus is not one of weary labor and heavy work. Jesus’ earlier analogy about the path to life being narrow and “difficult” (Matthew 7:14) is entirely separate, and speaking from a different perspective. From the view of the world, following Christ means taking on difficult circumstances and giving up worldly pleasures. From the view of eternity—of salvation—following Christ means giving up the impossible task of carrying our own sin.

A yoke is a wooden device used to harness the working power of an animal, especially oxen. These could be made for a single animal, or to combine the power of several. Jewish people described living under obedience to the Law as having a yoke upon them. In Jesus’ time, the Pharisees made that load even heavier by adding manmade requirements and regulations on top of the Law of Moses (Matthew 23:4).

Now He elaborates, inviting these listeners to put His yoke on them.

The implication is to allow Jesus to put His own yoke on us, the way a farmer would put one on his livestock. It means giving Jesus control and letting Him direct our efforts. The work He has will not be difficult, Jesus says. He wants them to learn from Him. Unlike the Pharisees, Jesus insists that He is gentle. He is lowly in heart (Philippians 2:6–7). He has not come to add to their burden but to give them rest for their souls.

Hebrews 4:9, KJV: “There remaineth therefore a rest to the people of God.” Here, the point is made that since God’s seventh day Sabbath rest from creation (Hebrews 4:3–4) is ongoing, the “rest” He offers is available right now, to those willing to trust and obey.

Here are sermons from Pastors Nathan and Salia Gonmei at Abundance Grace Church in Chiang Mai Thailand teaching us in this 3 part series on A Healthy Soul. the sermons are in both English and Thai so you can share with your Thai friends.

Thai Royal Grand Palace

Thai Royal Grand Palace

The Thai Royal Grand Palace Bangkok Thailand

There are many Thai words in this blog so if you are listening to the Podcast the pronunciation of some words might not be correct. We apologize.

This city landmark should be the first place on any visitor’s itinerary. It is a huge compound on Na Phra Lan Road surrounded by high white walls and occupies an area of about a square mile. The Royal Palace, begun in 1782 when Bangkok was founded as the capital of Thailand, consists of several buildings with highly decorated architectural designs.

The royal chapel or Wat Phra Kaeo, situated in the same compound, enshrines the sacred Emerald Buddha image and is noted for its very beautiful architecture and decorative elements.

On the right hand side, before entering the palace’s inner gate is the Royal Thai Decorations and Coin Pavilion which displays coins and other monetary exchange units used in Thailand since the early 11th century AD, as well as Royal regalia, decorations and medals used in the former royal courts.

The complex is open daily from 8.30 a.m.-3.30 p.m. Admission fee is 125 baht. (including a ticket to Vimanmek Royal Mansion). Proper attire is essential.

Construction of the Royal Palace began in 1782 and was completed in time for the coronation of Rama 1. The original living quarters were temporary and made of wood and thatch and the walls surrounding the palace were made of wood palisades. After the coronation the King moved into a mansion built of permanent materials. The only other building of permanent material at the time was Wat Phra Si Rattanasatsadaram (Temple of the Emerald Buddha) and the forts along the walls.

The plan of this new Royal Palace follow that of the Ayutthaya period. Only the central building seen today was missing until constructed as the Chakri Maha Prasat during the reign of King Rama 5. The area of the original palace was about 51 acres. King Rama 2 expanded the area to todays size of about 60 acres. The Royal Palace contains a number of halls, residences, and other buildings constructed by King Rama 1. Later monarchs altered some and renovated others while still others were enlarged or torn down to make way for newer buildings. All the buildings are not listed here but the most important ones are. The buildings are listed in groups according to their location inside the palace walls. A trip to Bangkok would not be complete without visiting the Royal Grand Palace.

Entrance to Chakraphat Phiman Phra-Thinang Chakradhat Phiman

The Phra Maha Monthain Group

Phra Maha Monthain

This group of buildings is located in the central part of the Grand Palace toward the eastern side. It was the first group of buildings constructed by King Rama 1 and his own residence. He also used it for his coronation and has been used for coronations of all monarchs of the Chakri This is the main building of the group and is a living apartment containing the Royal bed chamber and a large sitting room which now houses the Royal Regalia. It is the custom for the newly crowned King to spend a night in this palace to indicate that he has assumed the responsibilities for and power over the realm. the first few monarchs used this building as their living quarters but the Kings of later times built their own residences. They come here only to spend the night of their coronation in accordance with tradition.

Entrance to Phaisan-thaksin Audience HallPhra Thinang Phaisan-Thaksin

Phaisan-thaksin Audience Hall
Phaisan-thaksin Audience Hall

An important part of the coronation takes place here. On an octagonal throne the King receives the invitation from the representatives of the people to rule over the Kingdom. He also receives the Royal Regalia including the crown and the nine-tiered white umbrella from the chief of the Court Brahmin. In the middle of the hall is an alter where the symbolic guardian figure of Siam “Phra Siam Devadhiraj” was placed.

Entrance to Amarintha-Winitchai audience hall – Phra Thinang Amarintha-Winitchai Audience Hall

Phra Thinang Amarintha-Winitchai Audience Hall

There are two things in this hall which were made during the reign of King Rama 1. The upper throne is in the shape of a boat which is now used as an altar and another in front of it which is surmounted by a nine-tiered umbrella. In the olden days this building was used as the formal audience hall where the King met with his officials to discuss state affairs. This audience hall is used for many ceremonies such as their majesties birthday rites and merit making ceremonies. The King also received the credentials of foreign envoys in this hall.

Dusidaphirom PavilionPhra Thinang Dusida Phirom

Dusidaphirom PavilionPhra Thinang Dusida Phirom

This Pavilion was built in the time of King Rama 1 and originally made of wood. Bricks and mortar were added during the reign of King Rama 3. This building was the robing chamber for the arriving or departing king by Palanquin or elephant.

Phra Thinang Chakri Maha Prasat Group

This group was built by King Chulalongkorn (Rama 5) and in the beginning consisted of 11 buildings but only three remain today.

Chakri Maha Prasat
This building was constructed by King Rama 5 to commemorate the centenary of the Chakri Dynasty. It was designed by a British architect in the European style with a pure Thai Style roof. Construction took six years from 1876 to 1882.

Chakri Maha Prasat

Chakri Maha Prasat On the top floor of the central mansion are kept the royal ashes and the king gives public audiences from the front projection. The second floor serves as an audience hall and the ground floor is the office of the royal guards.

On the top floor of the eastern wing religious objects are kept. the middle floor serves as a reception hall for royal guests. the lower floor serves as a guest waiting room.

On the top floor of the western wing ashes are kept of the royal queens and high ranking princes and princesses. The middle floor is the guest chambers and the lower floor serves as a library.

The Throne Room

Two galleries join the central portion to both the east and west wing. The eastern portion also has a reception room where portraits of the kings of the Chakri dynasty from Rama 1 to Rama 7 are displayed. In the west portion is a hall where portraits of the queens of Rama 4, Rama 5, and Rama 7 are displayed.

The Throne Room

In the rear center of the Chakri Maha Prasat is the Chakri Throne Room. Here the King receives ambassadors on the occasion of the presentation of their credentials. The emblem of the Chakri dynasty is depicted on the wall behind the throne.

Borophiman Mansion and Siwalai Garden Group

When King Rama 2 had the palace precincts expanded he ordered three golden halls and many European and Chinese style building to be constructed. Later King Rama 3 had these buildings pulled down to make room for temples to be constructed dedicated to his late father. King Mongkut (Rama 3) ordered a residence also be constructed and stayed there until the end of his life.

Phra-Thinang Siwalai Maha Prasat

Siwalai Maha Prasat, Phra-Thinang Siwalai Maha Prasat

This building was built by King Chulalongkorn (Rama 5) to enshrine the statues of the four previous kings in the Chakri dynasty in 1869. Later King Rama 6 had the statues moved to the Temple of the Emerald Buddha. Since then Siwalai Maha Prasat has been left vacant.

Sitalaphirom PavilionPhra-Thinang Sitalaphirom

Sitalaphirom Pavilion, Phra-Thinang Sitalaphirom

This small pavilion made of wood was built by King Rama 6 as a place for his private repose and as a seat during open air parties. At present the King sits there when he gives a garden party or on his birthday for high ranking government officials.

Phra Phuttha Rattanasathan

Phra Phuttha Rattanasathan

This building was built by King Rama 4 to install the Buddha image called Phra Buddha Butsavarat which was brought from Champasak in Laos. The building has been used by the king for some Buddhist rituals including ordination ceremonies.

Boromphiman Mansionm, Phra-Thinang Boromphiman

Boromphiman MansionPhra-Thinang Boromphiman

This European style building was built by King Rama 5 who planned to give it to the crown prince, H.R.H. prince Maha Vajirunahis who died before it was completed. Prior to his coronation King Rama 7 stayed here for sometime. King Ananda Mahidol (Rama 8) took residence here together with his younger brother and mother when they returned from Europe in 1945. King Rama 8 passed away in this mansion. It now serves as a guest house for visiting royalty and heads of state.

Phra-Thinang Sutthaisawan Phra-Thinang Sutthaisawan

Phra-Thinang Sutthaisawan

Originally a wood structure without any roof decorations built by King Rama 1 to watch parades and the training of elephants. King Rama 3 had it replaced as it is today. It is used to receive public audience from the balcony.

The complex is open daily from 8.30 a.m.-3.30 p.m. Admission fee is 125 baht. (including a ticket to Vimanmek Royal Mansion). Proper attire is essential.

Thai Boxing, Muay Thai in Chiang Mai Thailand

Thai boxing, Muay Thai
Thai boxing, Muay Thai

The art of Thai Boxing, Muay Thai, has been the country’s most popular spectator sport for hundreds of years.

It is unique among other kinds of fighting disciplines in its approach to close quarters fighting. Fighters are able to more effectively use their elbows, knees, feet and fists than in other martial art.

The art of Muay Thai has been the country’s most popular spectator sport for hundreds of years.. It is unique among other kinds of fighting disciplines in its approach to close quarters fighting. Fighters are able to more effectively use their elbows, knees, feet and fists than in other martial art.

Muay Thai, Thai boxing
Muay Thai, Thai boxing

The sport differs from international-style boxing in several ways. International boxing allows the use of only the fists, and blows ‘below the belt or to the kidney area are illegal as are certain kinds of punches. In Muay Thai, the fighters are allowed to do almost anything so long as they don’t cover their opponent’s face with their gloves or poke their opponent’s eyes with their fingers. This makes it a more dangerous sport for the participants, but much more exciting for the Thai spectators .

Before every match, the two fighters dance around the ring to special boxing music. The music pervades the entire event, both uplifting and following the mood of the evening. The dance is called the ‘Raam Muay’ or ‘Wai Kru’ and is intended to honor and pay respect to the boxer’s trainer, his religion, family, sport and the ‘fighting spirits’ . Gamblers and spectators say that they can tell how a fighter will do in the ring simply by watching how he performs the ‘Raam Muay’.

One of Muay Thai’s most feared tactics is the use of elbows. Boxers have a whole repertoire of forward elbows, back elbows and guards. The fearsome Muay Thai fighters of old were said to be able to use their elbows as clubs, swords and axe – resulting from the hard bone at the tip of the elbow and the size of the appendage make it a fearsome weapon. One of the elbow attacks, the swing-back elbow, is thought of as one of the most beautiful moves in Muay Thai, and some stadiums give special awards to boxers who can knock out an opponent this way.

Knees are another of Muay Thai’s unique weapons and skilled boxers can use them in both close and mid-range attacks and parries. There are only a few types of knee attacks, but the power that can be put into a kick is fear-inspiring . Muay Thai opponents often grab the other around the neck to add more force to their knee kicks, and to help their balance.

The feet and legs are the most characteristic of the Muay Thai techniques, so much so that when the Japanese borrowed the sport for their own use they called it ‘kick boxing’. The feet of a Muay Thai master can be used in many ways; sweeping kicks, jumping kicks, combinations with other attacks or even straight to the face of the opponent. Boxers practice kicking their own hands to strengthen their legs and increase their range.

The fist in Muay Thai, while not the most spectacular technique for the crowd, is the most versatile of all of the boxer’s choices. Jabs can be used effectively to annoy and anger the opponent. While hooks or uppercuts can be used to knock him out through a hole in his guard. Thai legends abound with tale of a man who could box with his fists from a crouching position, and even pull his opponent’s whiskers before getting hit. Effective straight punches can do damage to a boxer’s body. A punch must always be thrown to start a Muay Thai fight, alone or in combination with a elbow or knee attack.

The history of Muay Thai goes back some 2000 years, as long as Thai culture itself. As the Thai tribes migrated south from the southern Yunan province of China, they were exposed to attacks and constant harassment from various groups, including the expansionist Chinese. The people were forced to develop a strong military and a formal military doctrine. The military code was called the Chupasart, and it called on all able bodied people to be prepared to come to the aid of their leaders with the current weapons of the time; swords, spears, axes, bows and others. Since not everyone could afford these weapons, many took up the use of the human body as a weapon. Thus Muay Thai was born.

During the reign of King Naresuan the Great (16th cent.), Muay Thai was brought in as part of the training of foot soldiers and remains a part of their education to this day. Many of the day’s battles were settled by soldiers in hand-to-hand combat and Muay Thai reflects this use. Even today, many of the sport’s moves are efficient at breaking through the opponent’s defences to get to the other side.

As with many things in Thai history, it is said that kings have taken an interest in the sport before. One story involves a king in the Ayutthya period named Pra Jao Sri Sanpetch Vlil . He was said to be an avid boxer, and would often conceal himself in the clothes of a commoner in order to take part in the fun, despite the danger to him . Once he was accredited with beating all comers at a temple fair in Ban Pajanta in the Wiset Chaichan district.

Most people think good Thai Boxing can only be seen in Bangkok however excellent matches can be seen all over the Kingdom include small villages. In Chiang Mai Kawaila Boxing Stadium, across the street from Sampakoi market, has exciting matches every Friday night beginning at 8PM. Many good Thai restaurants and food vendors in the area so go purchase your ticket, enjoy a meal then watch the matches.

Wat Chedi Luang Buddhist Temple Chiang Mai Thailand

Wat Chedi Luang temple Chiang Mai Thailand
Wat Chedi Luang temple Chiang Mai Thailand

Located on Phrapokklao Road road in the city center Wat Chedi Luang was built in 1391 during the reign of King Saen Muang Ma.

Wat Chedi Luang Temple is a must visit when in Chiang Mai. It also houses the Inthakhin City Pillar essentially is for everyone to wish for happiness for all people of Chiang Mai.

Wat Chedi Luang was built in 1391 during the reign of King Saen Muang Ma. He intended the structure to house the ashes of his father, Ku Na. Appropriately; the site was designated as a ‘ku luang’, which houses ashes of royalty instead of a chedi, which house relics of the Buddha. The massive structure was expanded over the centuries, until it reached its final form in 1475, when King Tilokaraj made it the home of the Emerald Buddha, the most important cultural treasure in Thailand. At one point the structure was 144 feet wide and 282 feet tall.

Unfortunately, the pagoda was heavily damaged in the 1545 earthquake during the reign of Queen Mahadevi. The Emerald Buddha remained here for about six years after the earthquake, whereupon it was brought to Luang Prabang (in today’s Laos) by King Setthathirat, who ruled Chiang Mai for a short period in the years following in 1556.

The viharn, or worship hall was built in 1928, is a much newer structure decorated with naga (water snake) and peacock motifs. The standing Buddha image inside is known as the Phra Chao Attarot. Made of a combination of brass alloy and mortar, the image dates back to King Saen Muang Ma (r.1385-1401). The hall to the south near the entrance gate from main viharn contains the Inthakin City Pillar.

Inside Wat Chedi Luang Chiang Mai Thailand
Inside Wat Chedi Luang Chiang Mai Thailand

Here in Chiang Mai, people from the city, its suburbs and all over Northern Thailand will flock to pray, and pay respects, at the city’s Inthakin Pillar. Throughout Thailand, people will pray for a rainy season which will nourish the rice crop and ensure a health yharvest. Statues in small shelters surrounding this building are homes of guardian spirits. A week long ceremonies will be from May 24 until May 30.During this time, hundreds of people will attend the Inthakhin either in formal procession or as families or as individuals.

Inthakhin Pillar at Wat Chedi Luang
Inthakhin Pillar at Wat Chedi Luang

Paying respect and praying at the Inthakhin Pillar is not a Buddhist ceremony (the Pillar predates organized religions) but essentially is for everyone to wish for happiness for all people. The Pillar is sited within its own walk-in shrine which is only opened during this 7-day ceremony (visitors please note — the Pillar can not be seen at any other time of year). Any male may enter the shrine to see and to pray. An attire and attitude of respect is essential. Ladies are not permitted to enter the shrine but may view through the entrance portals. In the area surrounding the Inthakhin Pillar Shrine, thousands of candles and incense sticks will burn and there will be ritual washing of a Buddha image with lustral water. People will queue to file past the shrine and will lay gifts of flowers and fragrant herbs at many points circling the shrine. Chao Kawila, moved the Inthakhin Pillar to its present site from Wat Sadoe Muang in 1800.

He built statues of the kumaphan under shelters to the north and south of the main entrance to the temple. He also planted the three large Yang trees from Sri Lanka. According to legend, the tree nearest the City Pillar will protect Chiang Mai as long as it is not cut down. The Inthakhin Pillar — while not exactly in the geographic center of Chiang Mai is certainly at the heart of the people –remains a potent symbol of fertility to all the generations, young and old, of North Thailand.

The main temple at Wat Chedi Luang
The main temple at Wat Chedi Luang

As a visitor to our northern city, you are welcome to join, or observe, the ceremonies. The Inthakhin Pillar — within the precincts of Wat Chedi Luang — is another fascinating part of Chiang Mai and the ancient culture of Lanna Thai. Other buildings in the compound include the Lanna campus of the Mahamakut Buddhist University (This is the northern campus for monks of the Thammayut sect, a reformist sect founded by King Mongkut (Rama IV r.1851-1881, who was dissatisfied with the established Mahanikai sect in the late 1830’s). To the west of the chedi is a viharn with a reclining Buddha and the Sangkhachai Buddha.